Experimental Mechanics

, Volume 6, Issue 10, pp 481–492 | Cite as

Effect of fiber geometry on stress in fiber-reinforced composite materials

Maximum shear stresses were obtained photoelastically in the matrices of fiber-reinforced material models, constructed by casting a birefringent epoxy resin around variously arranged steel strips, and loaded in tension
  • Thomas F. MacLaughlin
Article

Abstract

Eleven two-dimensional photoelastic models of fiber-reinforced composite-material configurations were designed for the purpose of investigating the effects of various fiber-end shapes, various fiber arrangements and broken fibers on the shear-stress distribution in an elastic matrix. Maximum shear stresses in the matrix in the vicinity of fiber discontinuities are presented. The peak stress resulting from a gradually tapered fiber was found to be slightly higher than that from a square-ended fiber, and a round-ended fiber produced a peak stress which was slightly lower than that from the square-ended fiber. Peak stresses resulting from two square-ended fibers butted closely together were considerably higher and decreased with increasing gap length between fiber ends. It made little difference whether the gap between the butted fiber ends was open, simulating a void resulting from a broken fiber, or filled with matrix material.

Keywords

Shear Stress Mechanical Engineer Composite Material Fluid Dynamics Peak Stress 

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References

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Copyright information

© Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas F. MacLaughlin
    • 1
  1. 1.Experimental Mechanics and Thermodynamics LaboratoryWatervliet ArsenalWatervliet

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