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Geo-Marine Letters

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 179–187 | Cite as

Hydrocarbon gas in sediment of the Southern Pacific Ocean

  • Keith A. Kvenvolden
Article

Abstract

Methane, ethane, ethene, propane, and propene are common hydrocarbon gases in near-surface sediment from offshore areas in the southern Pacific Ocean near Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Tonga, New Zealand, and Antarctica. Sea floor sites for sampling of sediment were selected on the basis of anomalies in marine seismic records, and the samples were intentionally biased toward finding possible thermogenic hydrocarbon gases. In none of the areas, however, were thermogenic hydrocarbons clearly identified. The hydrocarbon gases that were found appear to be mainly the products ofin situ microbial processes.

Keywords

Ethene Methane Hydrocarbon Propane Ethane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith A. Kvenvolden
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Geological SurveyMenlo Park

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