Experimental Mechanics

, Volume 17, Issue 6, pp 223–227 | Cite as

Stress concentrations around multiple windows in a high-pressure vessel

Stress distributions around multiple radial windows in a high-pressure vessel were determined by photoelastic analysis of a model and by proof tests with strain gages of the actual vessel
  • J. E. Field
  • W. F. Kirkwood
Article
  • 111 Downloads

Abstract

A pressure vessel with four radial windows was designed in which to conduct equation-of-state experiments at pressures up to 1 GPa (145,000 psi). To determine the relative safety of the vessel, the stress distribution in the cylindrical sidewalls, particularly the stress concentration near the window openings, was studied. Conventional analysis was used for the initial evaluation but was found to give somewhat higher stress values than were actually present. Better determinations of the stress distribution were obtained by photoelastic analysis of a model of the pressurevessel linear and by proof tests with strain gages of the actual liner and the assembled pressure vessel. Apparently, the tapered sapphire windows, loaded in compression by the internal pressure in the vessel, modify the stress distribution sufficiently to allow operation at higher pressures than otherwise would be attainable. Design features of the pressure vessel are presented, together with a synoptic stress analysis, a photoelastic analysis, and results of the strain-gage studies.

Keywords

Fluid Dynamics Liner Stress Distribution Sapphire Stress Concentration 

List of Symbols

a

major axis of ellipse

b

minor axis of ellipse

E

modulus of elasticity

f

material fringe value (force/length/fringe)

K

σmaxnominal

n

number of photoelastic fringes

P

pressure

Pi(max)

maximum internal pressure

R

outside diameter/inside diameter (r 2 /r 0 )

r0

inside diameter of liner

r1

outside diameter of liner

r2

outside diameter of sleeve

S

yield stress

t

slice thickness

ϕ

S0/S1, ratio of yield stresses of outer and inner components

σm

meridional or longitudinal stress

σr

radial stress

σθ

hoop stress

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References

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Copyright information

© Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. E. Field
    • 1
  • W. F. Kirkwood
    • 1
  1. 1.Lawrence Livermore LaboratoryUniversity of CalifroniaLivermore

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