Experimental Mechanics

, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp 81–86 | Cite as

Elevated-temperature effects on strain gages on the YF-12A wing

Effect of slope changes and thermal effects on the calibrated strain gages of the complex delta wing of the supersonic YF-12A airplane
  • J. M. Jenkins
  • R. A. Field
  • W. J. Sefic
Article
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Abstract

A general study is made of the effects of structural heating on calibrated-strain-gage load measurements on the wing of a supersonic airplane. The primary emphasis is on temperature-induced effects as they relate to slope changes and thermal shifts of the applied load/strain relationships. These effects are studied by using the YF-12A airplane, a structural computer model, and subsequent analyses. Such topics as the thermal environment of the structure, the variation of load paths at elevated temperature, the thermal response characteristics of load equations, elevated-temperature load-measurement approaches, the thermal calibration of wings, and the correlation of strains are discussed. Ways are suggested to measure loads with calibrated strain gages in the supersonic environment.

Keywords

Elevated Temperature Fluid Dynamics Strain Gage Structural Computer Response Characteristic 

Symbols

L

shear, bending moment or torque

T

temperature

β

constant in the load equation

μ

nondimensional strain response

Subscripts

A

effect induced by aerodynamic forces

L

effect induced by aerodynamic and inertial forces

T

effect induced by temperature

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References

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Copyright information

© Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. Jenkins
    • 1
  • R. A. Field
    • 2
  • W. J. Sefic
    • 2
  1. 1.Aero-Structures DivisionNASA Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research CenterEdwards
  2. 2.Flight Loads Research FacilityNASA Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research CenterEdwards

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