Advertisement

Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 363–366 | Cite as

Organizing for excellence

  • Jannette Alexander
News of The Societies

Conclusion

Perhaps the knowledge base and the process of education which we clinical social workers know to be effective, the professional practice which we know to be sound and to which we are committed, have differentiated us from those who were our peers. We are related to them but no longer the same as them. The direct service advocates and the indirect service adherents, traveling in different directions, relating to diverse goals, and trained in separate methods, have evolved into two different professional entities bearing as many differences as similarities. If this is so, I would like to conceive of our parting not as a schism but as an unfolding of differentiated professionals and professions each having its own validity.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alexander, C. Editorial,NASW Record. Los Angeles, September, 1970, p. 2.Google Scholar
  2. Business and Professions Code. State of California Sections 9040–9057.Google Scholar
  3. McClure, J. Notes from the Dean: In support of public service.Human Interest, State School of Social Work, Sacramento, California, March, 1973, p. 3.Google Scholar
  4. Perlman, H. H.Confessions, concerns, and commitment of an ex-clinical social worker. Paper presented at the Second Biennial Scientific Conference, Society for Clinical Social Work, Los Angeles, October, 1973.Google Scholar
  5. Varley, B. K.Trends in social work education: Implications for clinical social work. Paper presented at the Second Biennial Scientific Congress, Society for Clinical Social Work, Los Angeles, October, 1973.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jannette Alexander

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations