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Experimental Mechanics

, Volume 36, Issue 3, pp 277–283 | Cite as

A biaxial test specimen for crack arrest studies

  • M. Kosai
  • A. Shimamoto
  • C. -T. Yu
  • A. S. Kobayashi
  • P. Tan
Article

Abstract

A biaxially loaded, single edge notched (SEN) fracture specimen, with mixed modes I and II loading, was used to study the crack arrest capability of a bonded and riveted tear strap without and with simulated multiple site damage (MSD). MSD was modeled by a 50-percent groove without which the running crack would inevitably kink due to KII loading. A total of thirty-one 2024-T3 aluminum specimens with various crack and MSD configurations were tested. The fracture parameters associated with straight and curved crack paths were determined by using the experimenta results to drive a dynamic finite element model of the specimen in its generation mode. The crack kinking and extension criteria were verified by the excellent agreement between the prediction based on these fracture parameters and the measured crack kinking angles. Comparison between the test results generated by the biaxial stress specimens and by those generated by small- and full-scale pressurized fuselage rupture experiments showed that this specimen can be used to prescreen the effectiveness of tear straps and crack arrestors in an airplane fuselage.

Keywords

Crack Path Fracture Parameter Biaxial Stress Crack Arrest Biaxial Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Kosai
    • 1
  • A. Shimamoto
    • 2
  • C. -T. Yu
    • 3
  • A. S. Kobayashi
    • 4
  • P. Tan
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of WashingtonSeattle
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringSaitama Institute of TechnologyOkabe, SaitamaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical EnineeringUniversity of WashingtonSeattle
  4. 4.Department of Mechanical EnineeringUniversity of WashingtonSeattle
  5. 5.Technical CenterFederal Aviation Administration, Atlantic City International Airport

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