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The Children's Television Workshop goes to school

  • Cheryl Gotthelf
  • Tina Peel
Article

Abstract

Repackaging existing educational television series to fit the needs of more narrowly defined audiences is a cost-effective way of delivering high-quality educational television into the schools. This article discusses both the technological and program-design barriers to wider use of television in classroom instruction and details the steps that the Children's Television Workshop took to make3-2-1 Contact, its educational television science series, a more effective science teaching tool.

Keywords

Science Teaching Educational Technology Classroom Instruction Teaching Tool Educational Television 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© the Association for Educational Communications and Technology 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cheryl Gotthelf
    • 1
  • Tina Peel
    • 2
  1. 1.School ServicesUSA
  2. 2.Children's Television WorkshopUSA

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