Atlantic Economic Journal

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 124–133 | Cite as

Book review

  • Jack E. Adams
  • John A. Flanders
  • Thomas R. Degregori
Article
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References

  1. Eileen Appelbaum,Back to Work: Determinants of Women's Successful Reentry, Boston: Auburn House, 1981.Google Scholar
  2. Thomas Daymont and Anne Statham, “Occupational Atypicality: Changes, Causes, and Consequences,” inUnplanned Careers: The Working Lives of Middle-Aged Women, edited by Lois Banfill Shaw, Lexington, Massachusetts: Lexington Books, 1983.Google Scholar
  3. C. L. Jusenius, “The Influence of Work Experience and Typicality of Occupational Assignment on Women's Earnings,” inDual Careers, Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1976.Google Scholar
  4. Frank L. Mott, (ed.),The Employment Revolution: Young American Women in the 1970's, Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 1982, 234 pp.Google Scholar
  5. Frank L. Mott and Sylvia F. Moore, “Marital Transitions and Employment,” inThe Employment Revolution: Young American Women in the 1970's, edited by Frank L. Mott, Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 1982.Google Scholar
  6. David Shapiro and Lois B. Shaw “Growth in the Labor Force Attachment of Married Women: Accounting for Changes in the 1970's,”Southern Economic Journal, October 1983, pp. 461–73.Google Scholar
  7. Lois Banfill Shaw, (ed.),Unplanned Careers: The Working Lives of Middle-Aged Women, Lexington, Massachusetts: Lexington Books, 1983, 149 pp.Google Scholar
  8. Lois Banfill Shaw and Theresa O'Brien, “Introduction and Overview,’ inUnplanned Careers: The Working Lives of Middle-Aged Women, edited by Lois Banfill Shaw, Lexington, Massachusetts: Lexington Books, 1983.Google Scholar
  9. Ann Statham and Patricia Rhoton, “Attitudes toward Women Working: Changes over Time and Implications for the Labor-Force Behaviors of Husbands and Wives,’ inUnplanned Careers: The Working Lives of Middle-Aged Women, edited by Lois Banfill Shaw, Lexington, Massachusetts. Lexington Books, 1983.Google Scholar

References

  1. P. T. Bauer,Dissent on Development, revised edition, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1976.Google Scholar
  2. J. R. Kearl, L. Clayne L. Pope, Gordon C. Whiting, and Larry T. Wimmer, “A Confusion of Economists?”American Economic Review, 69(2), 1979, pp. 28–37.Google Scholar
  3. Lloyd G. Reynolds, “The Spread of Economic Growth to the Third World,”Journal of Economic Literature, 21(3), 1983, pp. 941–80.Google Scholar

References

  1. David Morawetz,Twenty-five Years of Economic Development, 1950–1975, Washington, DC: The World Bank, 1977.Google Scholar
  2. N. W. Pirie, “The World Food Supply: Physical Limitations,” in Ralph Jones (ed.),Readings From Futures: A Collection of Articles from the Journal of Futures, 1974–80, Westbury Houses, 1981, p. 305. Articles originally published December 1976.Google Scholar
  3. Theodore W. Schultz,Investing in People: The Economics of Population Quality, Berkeley & Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1981, p. 6.Google Scholar
  4. Theodore W. Schultz,et al., Lectures in Agricultural Economics, Washington, DC: Economic Research Service, Bicentennial Year Lecture Series Committee, June 1977, p. 17.Google Scholar
  5. Grant M. Scobie,Investment in International Agricultural Research: Some Economic Dimensions, World Bank Staff Working Paper, No. 361, Washington, DC: World Bank 1979.Google Scholar
  6. Julian Simon,The Ultimate Resource, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1981. (Reviewed by Joseph Spengler in theAtlantic Economic Journal, Vol. XI, No. 1, March 1983, pp. 118–19.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Atlantic Economic Society 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack E. Adams
    • 1
  • John A. Flanders
    • 2
  • Thomas R. Degregori
    • 3
  1. 1.University of Arkansas at Little RockUSA
  2. 2.Central Methodist CollegeUSA
  3. 3.University of HoustonUSA

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