Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 15–34 | Cite as

Cognitive ego psychology and the psychotherapy of learning disorders

  • Jack L. Herman
  • Robert C. Lane
Article

Abstract

The single most common referral problem in middle childhood and adolescence is academic underachievement and learning failure. Yet, the term “learning disorder” lacks specificity as a diagnostic entity and offers no guidelines for psychotherapy. An appreciation of the developmental processes by which the undifferentiated, unstructured, self-less and objectless newborn becomes a more fully developed, self-sufficient individual, capable of adaptive functioning and formal academic learning is encompassed in contemporary psychoanalytic conceptions of the separation-individuation process. This theory provides an organizing, theoretical base for diagnosis and treatment of learning disorders. Based on these conceptions, we discuss therapeutic techniques which are appropriate to the level of developmental arrest at each of the phases of the separation-individuation process.

Keywords

Public Health Social Psychology Developmental Process Theoretical Base Middle Childhood 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack L. Herman
    • 1
  • Robert C. Lane
  1. 1.Roslyn

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