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Learningwith media: Restructuring the debate

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Additional information

Mark E. Davidson is deceased.

The authors would like to thank Richard Clark for initiating the debate over a decade ago and Bob Kozma for initiating this latest conversation. Colloquy is perhaps the bestmedium for knowledge construction. They also acknowledge the colloquy and suggestions from the Cognitive Learning Environments Group at Penn State (including the authors, Brenda Bannon Haag, Gary Hettinger, Phil Henning, and Carrie McKeague). We miss you, Mark. Your intelligence, compassion, and sincerity inspired us all.

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Jonassen, D.H., Campbell, J.P. & Davidson, M.E. Learningwith media: Restructuring the debate. ETR&D 42, 31–39 (1994). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02299089

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Keywords

  • Educational Technology