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Learningwith media: Restructuring the debate

  • David H. Jonassen
  • John P. Campbell
  • Mark E. Davidson
Research

Keywords

Educational Technology 
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References

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Copyright information

© Association for Educational Communications and Technology 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • David H. Jonassen
    • 1
  • John P. Campbell
    • 1
  • Mark E. Davidson
  1. 1.the Pennsylvania State UniversityUSA

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