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Rapid prototyping: An alternative instructional design strategy

Abstract

There is a design methodology calledrapid prototyping which has been used successfully in software engineering. Given the similarities between software design and instructional design, we argue that rapid prototyping is a viable model for instructional design, especially for computer-based instruction. Additionally, we argue that recent theories of design offer plausible explanations for the apparent success of rapid prototyping in software design. Such theories also support the notion that rapid prototyping is appropriate for instructional design. We offer guidelines for the use of rapid prototyping and list possible tradeoffs in its application.

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Tripp, S.D., Bichelmeyer, B. Rapid prototyping: An alternative instructional design strategy. ETR&D 38, 31–44 (1990). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02298246

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02298246

Keywords

  • Software Engineering
  • Educational Technology
  • Design Strategy
  • Instructional Design
  • Rapid Prototype