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Educational Technology Research and Development

, Volume 42, Issue 3, pp 71–82 | Cite as

Connecting education and practice in an instructional design graduate program

  • James Quinn
Development

Abstract

This paper reports on a curriculum project in which principles of instructional design are integrated with real-world experiences in a corporate environment. Working in design teams, graduate students served as instructional developers in a corporate environment. The course instructor acted as project leader. Initially, both the client organization and design teams expressed confusion concerning their roles in relation to the course instructor. Design teams initially used technical language not readily understood by the client. The lack of guidance in instructional models on the development of appropriate instructional strategies was noted by all teams. Design teams concluded that knowledge of instructional design principles is a necessary but not sufficient preparation for professional activity as instructional developers. By the end of the three-month project, both the client organization and the design teams expressed strong satisfaction with the process and the outcome.

Keywords

Educational Technology Design Principle Instructional Design Instructional Strategy Graduate Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© the Association for Educational Communications and Technology 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Quinn
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of IowaUSA

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