Psychometrika

, Volume 26, Issue 3, pp 291–306 | Cite as

Statistical methods for a theory of cue learning

  • Frank Restle
Article

Abstract

A theory of cue learning, which gives rise to a system of recurrent events in Feller's sense, is analyzed mathematically. The distribution of total errors and sampling distribution of mean errors are derived, and the learning curve is investigated. Maximum likelihood estimates of parameters and sampling variances of those estimates are derived. Likelihood ratio tests of the usual null hypotheses and approximate tests of goodness of fit of substantive hypotheses are developed. The distinguishing characteristic of these tests is that they are concerned with meaningful parameters of the learning process.

Keywords

Statistical Method Null Hypothesis Likelihood Ratio Public Policy Learning Process 

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Copyright information

© Psychometric Society 1961

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank Restle
    • 1
  1. 1.Michigan State UniversityUSA

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