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National estimates of mental health utilization and expenditures for children in 1998

  • Jeanne S. Ringel
  • Roland Sturm
Regular Articles

Abstract

No recent national data on expenditures and utilization are available to provide a benchmark for reform of mental health systems for children and adolescents. The most recent estimates, from 1986, predate the dramatic growth of managed care. This study provides updated national estimates. Treatment expenditures are estimated to be $11.68 billion ($172 per child). Adolescents have the highest expenditures at $293 per child followed by $163 per child aged 6 to 11 and $35 per preschoolaged child. Outpatient services account for 57%, inpatient for 33%, and psychotropic medications for 9% of the total. Unlike earlier reports, outpatient care now accounts for the majority of expenditures. This finding replicates the differences between recent managed care data and earlier actuarial databases for privately insured adults and confirms the trend from inpatient toward outpatient care.

Keywords

Mental Health Health System Health Promotion Health Psychology Disease Prevention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.RANDSanta Monica

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