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Training nonverbal and verbal play skills to mentally retarded and autistic children

  • David Coe
  • Johnny Matson
  • Virginia Fee
  • Ramasamy Manikam
  • Christine Linarello
Article

Abstract

Two mentally retarded boys with autism and one mentally retarded girl with Down syndrome were taught to initiate and play a ball game with an adult confederate. The program targeted both nonverbal responses related to the actual execution of the ball game as well as verbal responses for play initiation and providing compliments for the confederate's behavior. Training sessions provided ample practice in all aspects of the game from initiation to termination through use of brief play cycles. Instruction was provided using a combination of physical and verbal prompts as well as reinforcement and time-out. All three children learned the game and by the study's completion executed multiple play cycles each session. The implications of combining play and social skills training in programming for developmentally handicapped children are discussed.

Keywords

Training Session Social Skill Down Syndrome School Psychology Skill Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Coe
    • 1
  • Johnny Matson
    • 1
  • Virginia Fee
    • 1
  • Ramasamy Manikam
    • 1
  • Christine Linarello
    • 1
  1. 1.Louisiana State UniversityUSA

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