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Plant and Soil

, Volume 52, Issue 4, pp 527–536 | Cite as

Lime-induced chlorosis inPinus radiata

  • George Nakos
Article

Summary

Addition of marl (CaCO3) and/or manure to an acid soil in pots caused ‘lime-induced’ chlorosis inPinus radiata seedlings, especially after excessive irrigation for 15 days. Chlorotic symptoms and their intensity were found to be related more to soil moisture and to the HCO3 concentrations, than to percentage of free CaCO3, in the soil mixtures.

Comparative chemical analysis showed lower total Fe and Mn concentrations and higher concentrations of cations and organic anions in the needles of seedlings with chlorotic symptoms than in the needles of healthy ones.

Key Words

Greece Lime-induced chlorosis Pinus radiata 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Nakos
    • 1
  1. 1.Soil Science LaboratoryForest Research InstituteAthensGreece

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