Journal of Religion and Health

, Volume 21, Issue 2, pp 124–131 | Cite as

Therapeutic neutrality reconsidered

  • Robert H. Humphries
Article

Abstract

This paper suggests that therapists' tendency to ignore the impact of their own religious beliefs on their patients constitutes an area of potential abuse of psychotherapy. The author reviews the religious stance of the founders of psychotherapy, as well as recent criticisms of the therapeutic process, and proposes steps to safeguard against the inadvertent fostering of therapists' religious views on the patient.

Keywords

Religious Belief Recent Criticism Potential Abuse Therapeutic Process Religious View 

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Copyright information

© Institutes of Religion and Health 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert H. Humphries
    • 1
  1. 1.Acute Treatment and Evaluation UnitSilver Hill FoundationNew Canaan

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