Skip to main content

The role of Nuta (large amorphous particles) as a nutrient regenerator in Osaka Bay

Abstract

Large amorphous particles (Nuta) observed in coastal areas after phytoplankton blooms and red tide outbreaks were collected by Nuta traps. These particles are always thickly attached to mooring ropes and/or fishing nets. From the decomposition experiments of Nuta and the sinking particles, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) regenerations were active in Nuta, but were not active in sinking particles. In Nuta, regeneration abundances during 10 days were 567 μg-N/mg of initial particulate organic nitrogen (PON), and 583 μ-P/mg of initial particulate phosphorus (PP), respectively. Thus DIP was more regenerated from Nuta than DIN. Ten days integral regeneration abundances of DIN and DIP from Nuta were estimated to be 36% and 79% of in situ DIN and DIP standing stocks, respectively. Nuta contributes an important role of nutrient regeneration particularly DIN, in coastal water. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of suspended particles, sinking particles and Nuta indicated that these three different type of particles were almost the same origin, and thus Nuta in the coastal water should be made from phytoplankton debris.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Alldredge, A. L. (1976): Discarded appendicularation houses as sources of food, surface habitats and particulate organic matter in planktonic environments.Limnol. Oceanogr.,21, 14–23.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Alldredge, A. L. and J. L. Cox (1982): Primary production and chemical composition of marine snow in surface waters Southern California Bight.J. Mar. Res.,40, 517–527.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Alldredge, A. L. and M. W. Silver (1988): Characteristics, dynamics and significance of marine snow.Prog. Oceanogr.,20, 41–82.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  4. Altabet, M. A. (1988): A time-series study of the vertical structure of nitrogen and particle dynamics in the Sargasso Sea.Limnol. Oceanogr.,34, 1185–1201.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Beers, J. R., J. D. Trent, F. M. H. Reid and A. L. Shanks (1986): Macroaggregates and their phytoplankton composition in the Southern California Bight.J. Plantton. Res.,8, 475–487.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Cifuentes, L. A., J. H. Sharp and M. L. Forgel (1988): Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope biogeochemistry in the Deleware estuary.Limnol. Oceanogr.,33, 1102–1115.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Johnson, B. D. and R. C. Cooke (1980): Organic aggregate formation resulting from distribution of bubbles in sea water.Limnol. Oceanogr.,25, 653–661.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Minagawa, M. and E. Wada (1985): Biogeochemical implication of H, C, N, O stable isotope composition in plant and animal.Chikyu-kagaku,19, 39–52.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Mishima, Y., S. Montani and T. Okaichi (1990a): The nature and distribution of large amorphous particles (NUTA) in Osaka Bay, Japan.Geochem. J.,24, 197–206.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Mishima, Y., S. Montani and T. Okaichi (1990b): Large amorphous particles (Nuta): The development of the sampling system and comparison with suspended and sinking particles.La mer.,28, 123–130.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Montani, S., K. Tada and T. Okaichi (1988): Purine and pyrimidine bases in marine particles in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan.Mar. Chem.,25, 359–371.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  12. Montani, S., Y. Mishima and T. Okaichi (1991a): Some characteristic features of large amorphous aggregates (Nuta) in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan.J. Oceanogr. Soc. Japan,47, 276–285.

    Google Scholar 

  13. Montani, S., Y. Mishima and T. Okaichi (1991b): Scavenging processes of marine particles in Osaka Bay.Mar. Pollut. Bull.,23, 107–111.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  14. Ogura, N., K. Kimura, T. Sekigawa, K. Yamada and M. Minagawa (1986): Stable isotope ratios of particulate organic carbon in surface water at inner part of Tokyo Bay.Chikyu-kagaku,20, 13–19.

    Google Scholar 

  15. Paerl, H. W. (1973): Detritus in Lake Tahoe: Structural modification by attached microflora.Science,180, 496–498.

    Google Scholar 

  16. Paerl, H. W. (1974): Bacterial uptake of dissolved organic matter in relation to detrital aggregation in marine and fresh water system.Limnol. Oceanogr.,21, 966–972.

    Google Scholar 

  17. Parsons, T. R., Y. Maita and C. M. Lalli (1984a):A Manual of Chemical and Biological Methods for Sea Water Analysis. Pergamon Press, New York.

    Google Scholar 

  18. Pomeroy, E. R. and D. Deibel (1980): Aggregation of organic matter by pelagic tunicates.Limnol. Oceanogr.,25, 643–652.

    Google Scholar 

  19. Seiki, T., E. Date and H. Izawa (1991): Decomposition characteristics of particulate organic matter in Hiroshima Bay.J. Oceanogr. Soc. Japan,47, 207–220.

    Google Scholar 

  20. Shanks, A. L. and J. D. Trent (1979): Marine snow: Microscale nutrient patches.Limnol. Oceanogr. 24, 850–854.

    Google Scholar 

  21. Shanks, A. L. and J. D. Trent (1980): Marine snow: sinking rates and potential role in vertical flux.Deep-Sea Res.,27, 137–143.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  22. Silver, M. W., A. L. Shanks and J. D. Trent (1978): Marine snow: microplankton habbitat and source of small-scale pachiness in pelagic populations.Science,201, 371–373.

    Google Scholar 

  23. Trent, J. D., A. L. Shanks and M. W. Silver (1978): In situ and laboratory measurements on macroscopic aggregates in Monterey Bay, California.Limnol. Oceanogr.,23, 626–635.

    Google Scholar 

  24. Tujita, T. (1952): A preliminary study on naturally occurring suspended matter in waters adjacent to Japan.J. Oceanogr. Soc. Japan,8, 113–126.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Montani, S., Mishima, Y. The role of Nuta (large amorphous particles) as a nutrient regenerator in Osaka Bay. J Oceanogr 49, 285–293 (1993). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02269566

Download citation

Keywords

  • Phytoplankton
  • Stable Isotope
  • Fishing
  • Dissolve Inorganic Nitrogen
  • Phytoplankton Bloom