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Journal of Adult Development

, Volume 2, Issue 3, pp 147–158 | Cite as

Some suggestions for the conduct of biographical research

  • Peter M. Newton
Article

Abstract

Despite the strong and growing interest in biography, few psychologists engage in such studies themselves or feel competent to supervise them. Yet biography is a naturalistic form of empirical research and a rich source of ideas about the development of the individual across the life span. I offer a set of five suggestions for the conduct of biographical research and illustrate its use with examples drawn from archival and biographical interviewing studies. Three of the five suggestions concern the selection, presentation, and interpretation of data, areas where the psychologist's concern about investigator bias and reliability of interpretation has been greatest.

Key words

Biography adult development qualitative research methods 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter M. Newton
    • 1
  1. 1.The Wright InstituteBerkeley

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