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Journal of Family and Economic Issues

, Volume 17, Issue 3–4, pp 313–325 | Cite as

Children's time in household work: Estimation issues

  • Margaret Mietus Sanik
  • Kathryn Stafford
Methodological Issues in the Study of Time

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to analyze children's time in household production using tobit analysis to adjust for nonparticipation and to compare the results to a regression analysis. In general, more variables are significant in each of the analyses based upon gender and birth order of the children. More importantly, the additional variables go beyond whether the day was a schoolday and the age of the child. The past failure of children's time spent in household work to change with differences in their families' characteristics appears to have been an artifact of not accounting for nonparticipation when estimating marginal effects.

Key Words

children household work time use 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret Mietus Sanik
    • 1
  • Kathryn Stafford
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Consumer and Textile SciencesThe Ohio State UniversityColumbus
  2. 2.Department of Family Resource Management at The Ohio State UniversityColumbus

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