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European Journal of Nuclear Medicine

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 16–19 | Cite as

Thyroidal handling of radioiodine in sea level residents exposed to hypobaric hypoxia

  • S. B. Rawal
  • M. V. Singh
  • A. K. Tyagi
  • B. N. Chaudhuri
Original Article
  • 23 Downloads

Abstract

In the present investigation thyroidal accumulation of radioiodine and its release were assessed by direct testing of thyroid function using radioactive iodine, in vivo, in sea level residents intermittently exposed to hypobaric hypoxia. Thyroidal accumulation of radioiodine and its turnover were examined daily for 14 days. Twelve healthy human male volunteers were divided into three groups, with an equal number of individuals in each group. A decompression chamber was used to expose each group of subjects to hypoxic conditions at a simulated altitude of 3810 m for 8 h/day for 14 days. An oral dose of 25μCi iodine-131 was administered to each individual of the first group immediately before the initiation of intermittent hypoxia. The second group of subjects received a tracer dose at the beginning of the 4th day of the 14 days, intermittent exposure to hypoxia, while the third group received the tracer dose 1 week after the completion of the exposure. Control studies were carried out on the subjects before they were subjected to the experimental conditions. Thyroidal accumulation of131I in experimental subjects during the hypoxic state and in the post-hypoxic state was higher than in the control studies. The pattern of accumulation during exposure to hypoxia and in the post-hypoxic state showed multiple peaks of radioactive iodine uptake (PRAIU), a unique feature. The multiple PRAIU by the thyroid in experimental subjects were sharp and of short duration, reflecting an increased rate of13I release from the thyroid. Control subjects had a single PRAIU by the thyroid 24 h after the administration of tracer.

Key words

Thyroid function Hypoxia Simulated altitude 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. B. Rawal
    • 1
  • M. V. Singh
    • 1
  • A. K. Tyagi
    • 1
  • B. N. Chaudhuri
    • 1
  1. 1.Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied SciencesDelhi Cantt, DelhiIndia

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