Serum α1-antichymotrypsin is not a useful marker for Alzheimer's disease or dementia in Parkinson's disease

  • M. A. Kuiper
  • G. J. van Kamp
  • P. L. M. Bergmans
  • Ph. Scheltens
  • E. Ch. Wolters
Full Papers

Summary

We measured serum α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) levels in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) and age-matched controls to evaluate whether serum ACT levels in AD patients were elevated and whether ACT levels in PD patients with dementia differed from those in PD or AD. None of the patient groups displayed an increase in ACT levels. We conclude that serum ACT is not useful as a marker, nor in AD nor in dementia in PD.

Keywords

α1-Antichymotrypsin neurodegeneration Alzheimer's disease Parkinson's disease dementia multiple system atrophy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. Kuiper
    • 1
  • G. J. van Kamp
    • 1
  • P. L. M. Bergmans
    • 2
  • Ph. Scheltens
    • 1
  • E. Ch. Wolters
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyFree University HospitalAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Clinical ChemistryFree University HospitalAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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