Plant and Soil

, Volume 185, Issue 1, pp 163–167 | Cite as

A telescopic method for photographing within 8×8 cm minirhizotrons

  • Geert Poelman
  • Johan van de Koppel
  • Gerard Brouwer
Regular Research Articles

Abstract

A system for photographing within 8 × 8 cm minirhizotrons is described, that uses a telescopic lens instead of an endoscope. A comparison was made between the telescope system and the commonly used endoscope system. Photographs obtained with the telescope system are of superior quality as compared to those of the endoscope system, without a decrease in the field of view. Photographs obtained by the telescope system can easily be aligned in a sequence that shows the entire length of the minirhizotron wall as a single image. Furthermore, the telescope system is portable, shockproof, cheap, easily repaired, and can be operated by a single person.

Key words

endoscope minirhizotron root study methods root growth root distribution 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Geert Poelman
    • 1
  • Johan van de Koppel
    • 1
  • Gerard Brouwer
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Plant EcologyUniversity of GroningenHaren (Gr)The Netherlands
  2. 2.Research Institute for Agrobiology and Soil FertilityHaren (Gr)The Netherlands

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