Differential effects of three dopamine receptor agonists in MPTP-treated monkeys

  • N. Arai
  • M. Isaji
  • H. Miyata
  • J. Fukuyama
  • E. Mizuta
  • S. Kuno
Full Papers

Summary

The behavioral effects of cabergoline, pergolide and bromocriptine were investigated in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioned parkinsonian cynomolgus monkeys with attention to the induction of hyperactivity, as evidenced by irritability, excitability and aggressiveness. All three drugs improved the parkinsonism in a dose-dependent fashion following a single injection. Among the three dopamine (DA) receptor agonists used, the antiparkinsonian effect of pergolide was the strongest and had an immediate effect, while cabergoline showed the longest duration of the antiparkinsonian effect and was least potent in inducing hyperactivity.

Keywords

Dopamine receptor agonists Parkinson's disease parkinsonism hyperactivity 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Arai
    • 1
  • M. Isaji
    • 1
  • H. Miyata
    • 1
  • J. Fukuyama
    • 1
  • E. Mizuta
    • 2
  • S. Kuno
    • 2
  1. 1.The Pharmacological LaboratoriesKissei Pharmaceutical Co. LTD.Nagano
  2. 2.Department of Neurology and Clinical Research CenterUtano National HospitalKyotoJapan

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