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Journal of Biomedical Science

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 430–435 | Cite as

A p53 codon 72 polymorphism associated with prostate cancer development and progression in Japanese

  • Kazuhiro Suzuki
  • Hiroshi Matsui
  • Nobuaki Ohtake
  • Seiji Nakata
  • Tomoyuki Takei
  • Haruki Nakazato
  • Hironobu Okugi
  • Hidekazu Koike
  • Yoshihiro Ono
  • Kazuto Ito
  • Kohei Kurokawa
  • Hidetoshi Yamanaka
Original Paper

Abstract

An association between the Pro/Pro genotype of p53 codon 72 and a lower risk of prostate cancer in Caucasians was recently reported. However, the association of this polymorphism with prostate cancer risk in a Japanese population has not been clarified. We performed a case-control study consisting of 114 prostate cancer patients and 105 noncancer controls. Sixty-nine percent (79 of 114) of the patients had a positive family history. The genotypic frequencies in the controls were 39.0% for Arg/Arg, 54.3% for Arg/Pro and 6.7% for Pro/Pro; they were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. When a comparison of the distribution of the p53 codon 72 polymorphism was made between patients with a first-degree family history and all control subjects, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for prostate cancer associated with the Arg/Arg, Arg/Pro and Pro/Pro genotypes were 1.00, 0.99 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53–1.88] and 2.80 (95% CI 1.04–7.53), respectively. When stratification of cases was performed based on clinical stage (localized or metastatic cancer) and pathological grade (a Gleason score of <7 or ≥7), there tended to be a greater number of patients with localized cancers among those patients with the Arg/Pro genotype than among those with the Arg/Arg genotype (overall cases: age-adjusted OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.13–1.00, p=0.049; positive family history cases: age-adjusted OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.075–0.84, p=0.025). In addition, there tended to be a greater number of patients with low-grade cancers among those with the Pro/Pro genotype than among those with other genotypes (overall cases: age-adjusted OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.13–1.30, p=0.13; positive family history cases: age-adjusted OR 0.20, 95% CI 0.004–0.89, p=0.035). The present findings suggest that the Pro/Pro genotype of p53 codon 72 played a role in prostate cancer susceptibility in a Japanese population. However, the Pro allele did not appear to worsen such clinical parameters as clinical stage or pathological grade.

Key Words

p53 Codon 72 Prostate cancer 

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Copyright information

© National Science Council 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuhiro Suzuki
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Matsui
    • 1
  • Nobuaki Ohtake
    • 1
  • Seiji Nakata
    • 1
  • Tomoyuki Takei
    • 1
  • Haruki Nakazato
    • 1
  • Hironobu Okugi
    • 1
  • Hidekazu Koike
    • 1
  • Yoshihiro Ono
    • 1
  • Kazuto Ito
    • 1
  • Kohei Kurokawa
    • 1
  • Hidetoshi Yamanaka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of UrologyGunma University School of MedicineMaebashi, GunmaJapan

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