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Motivation and Emotion

, Volume 20, Issue 2, pp 121–147 | Cite as

Facial feedback hypotheses: Evidence, implications, and directions

  • Daniel N. McIntosh
Article

Abstract

This review evaluates four facial feedback hypotheses, each proposing a certain relation between the face and emotions. It addresses criticisms of the data, considers implications for emotional and social processes, and advises directions for future research. The current data support the following: Facial actions are sensitive to social context, yet correspond to the affective dimension of emotions; matches with specific emotions are unlikely. They modulate ongoing emotions, and initiate them. These two claims have received substantially improved support, in part due to studies controlling for effects of experimental demand and task difficulty. Facial action may influence the occurrence of specific emotions, not simply their valence and intensity. Facial action is not necessary for emotions. There are multiple and nonmutually exclusive plausible mechanisms for facial effects on emotions. Future work must focus on determining the relative contributions of these mechanisms, and the parameters of their effects on emotions.

Keywords

Social Psychology Social Context Current Data Social Process Task Difficulty 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel N. McIntosh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of DenverDenver

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