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Transplacentally-transported 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) affects the catecholamine and indoleamine levels in the fetal mouse brain

  • Y. Ohya
  • M. Naoi
  • N. Ochi
  • N. Mizutani
  • K. Watanabe
  • T. Nagatsu
Full Papers

Summary

The effects of a dopaminergic neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) on the amounts of dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were examined in the whole brains of fetal mice and maternal mice after its administration to pregnant mice. DA and DOPAC concentrations were decreased significantly in both the fetal and maternal brains. At 3 hr after injection, reduction of the DOPAC concentration was more marked than that of DA in both the fetal and maternal brains. Increase of 5-HT concentration was observed until 12 hr after injection in the fetal brains and 6 hr in the maternal brains. These results indicate that 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium ion (MPP+) and MPTP affect the levels of catechol- and indoleamines in the brain of premature stage as well as in the mature brain.

Keywords

Fetal brain 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion catecholamine indoleamine 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Ohya
    • 1
  • M. Naoi
    • 3
  • N. Ochi
    • 1
  • N. Mizutani
    • 1
  • K. Watanabe
    • 1
  • T. Nagatsu
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsNagoya University School of MedicineNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryNagoya University School of MedicineNagoyaJapan
  3. 3.Department of BioscienceNagoya Institute of TechnologyNagoyaJapan

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