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The auditory P300 correlates with specific cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease

  • S. Pang
  • J. C. Borod
  • A. Hernandez
  • I. Bodis-Wollner
  • S. Raskin
  • L. Mylin
  • L. Coscia
  • M. D. Yahr
Full Papers

Summary

An abnormally prolonged latency of the P300 event-related potential has been reported in several types of dementing illnesses, including Parkinson's disease (PD). While some PD patients have dementia, a significant number of PD patients have less severe cognitive impairments. We examined the relationship between the auditory P300 and a neuropsychological battery of 11 tasks in 43 PD patients. The quantitative relationship between the individual neuropsychological measures and the P300 was examined using partial correlation and analysis of covariance techniques which controlled for age, education, and illness duration. The strongest correlations were between P300 and both shortterm memory and visual perception. Global cognitive deficits do not appear to relate to the abnormal P300 responses in PD: instead, specific aspects of cognitive decline accounted for the electrophysiological abnormalities. An abnormally long or absent P300 correlated with deficits on select cognitive tasks: those involving memory, visual perception, and abstract reasoning. The interactions between anatomical and neurochemical abnormalities in PD are discussed in light of the pattern of deficits seen in this study.

Keywords

Parkinson's disease P300 evoked potential neuropsychological measures cognition 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Pang
    • 1
  • J. C. Borod
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Hernandez
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. Bodis-Wollner
    • 1
    • 3
  • S. Raskin
    • 2
  • L. Mylin
    • 1
  • L. Coscia
    • 2
  • M. D. Yahr
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, Mount Sinai School of MedicineQueens College of the City University of New YorkFlushingU.S.A.
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyQueens College of the City University of New YorkFlushingU.S.A.
  3. 3.Department of OphthalmologyMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkU.S.A.

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