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Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 32, Issue 5, pp 431–443 | Cite as

The demographics of disability in the south

  • Charles E. HolzerIII
  • Hoang Thanh Nguyen
  • Harold F. Goldsmith
  • William W. Thompson
Article

Abstract

A major issue for health reform is the equitable distribution of health services. Equity in the use of services depends in large part on the distribution of need for services, in addition to availability, accessibility, affordability, and acceptability of the services. The present paper focuses on one set of indicators of need, the disability data reported in the 1990 U.S. Census of Population and Housing for 14 southern states. The Census data on work limitation, inability to work, physical mobility, and ability to perform routine personal care show differentials for subpopulations defined by rural versus urban areas within levels of poverty, age, sex, education, and ethnic group. Highest rates of work disability are found for rural, female, elderly, less educated, African-American, and below poverty level populations. The implications of such findings for health care reform suggest that there should be greater access to services by populations of greater identified need. Historically, the opposite has been true, perhaps exacerbating the observed differentials in need.

Keywords

Health Service Ethnic Group Social Psychology Health Psychology Level Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles E. HolzerIII
    • 1
  • Hoang Thanh Nguyen
  • Harold F. Goldsmith
  • William W. Thompson
  1. 1.Psychiatry, Room 1, 213 GravesUniversity of Texas Medical BranchGalveston

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