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Quantification of mRNA of tyrosine hydroxylase and aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase in the substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia

  • H. Ichinose
  • T. Ohye
  • K. Fujita
  • F. Pantucek
  • K. Lange
  • P. Riederer
  • T. Nagatsu
Rapid Communication

Summary

Using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we developed a sensitive and quantitative method to detect all four types of human tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNAs in the human brain (substantia nigra). All four types of TH mRNAs were found in the substantia nigra in the control brains examined, and the ratio of type-1, type-2, type-3, and type-4 mRNAs to the total amount of TH was 45, 52, 1.4, and 2.1%, respectively. The average amount of total TH mRNA in the normal brain (substantia nigra) was 5.5 amol of TH mRNA per μg of total RNA. The ratios of four TH isoforms were not altered significantly in Parkinson's disease or schizophrenia. Further we measured the relative amount of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) and β-actin mRNAs in the brain samples. TH and AADC mRNAs were highly correlated in the control cases. We found that parkinsonian brains had very low levels of all four TH isoforms and AADC mRNAs in the substantia nigra compared with control brains, while no significant differences were found between schizophrenic brains and normal ones. Since the decrease in AADC mRNA was comparable to that in TH mRNA, the alteration of TH in Parkinson's disease would not be a primary event, but it would reflect the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. This is the first reported measurement of mRNA contents of TH isoforms and AADC in Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia.

Key words

Tyrosine hydroxylase aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase Parkinson's disease schizophrenia RT-PCR mRNA 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Ichinose
    • 1
  • T. Ohye
    • 1
  • K. Fujita
    • 1
  • F. Pantucek
    • 2
  • K. Lange
    • 2
  • P. Riederer
    • 3
  • T. Nagatsu
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Comprehensive Medical Science, School of MedicineFujita Health UniversityToyoake, AichiJapan
  2. 2.Department of PathologyLandeskrankenhausAmstettenAustria
  3. 3.Clinical Neurochemistry, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of WürzburgWürzburgFederal Republic of Germany

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