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Emotion and the physician-patient relationship

Abstract

This paper develops a framework of the role of empathy in patient care and explicitly links the framework to important outcomes. Following a definition of empathy and clinical examples, evidence is reviewed on the relevance of empathy to increasing patient satisfaction, increasing adherence with physician recommendations, and decreasing the frequency of medical malpractice suits.

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Correspondence to Richard M. Frankel.

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Frankel, R.M. Emotion and the physician-patient relationship. Motiv Emot 19, 163–173 (1995). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02250509

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Keywords

  • Patient Care
  • Social Psychology
  • Patient Satisfaction
  • Medical Malpractice
  • Physician Recommendation