Psychopharmacology

, Volume 110, Issue 1–2, pp 1–4 | Cite as

Differential sensitivity to midazolam discriminative-stimulus effects following self-administered versus response-independent midazolam

  • Nancy A. Ator
  • Roland R. Griffiths
Original Investigations

Abstract

Interactions between the discriminative and reinforcing effects of midazolam were studied in two baboons trained to discriminate midazolam (0.32 mg/kg, IV) from saline. The midazolam generalization gradient determined after the baboons were permitted to self-administer midazolam (IV) was shifted to the left of that determined before self-administration. In contrast, the midazolam generalization gradient determined after the same doses of midazolam were delivered response-independently, but in the same order and with the same temporal pattern as during self-administration, was shifted to the right of that determined just before the response-independent phase. These data suggest that sensitivity to the discriminative-stimulus effects of a drug can be modulated by behavioral experience with that drug.

Key words

Midazolam Baboon Discrimination Self-administration 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Barrett JE, Glowa JR, Nader MA (1989) Behavioral and pharmacological history as determinants of tolerance- and sensitization-like phenomena in drug action. In: Goudie AJ, Emmett-Oglesby MW (eds) Psychoactive drugs: tolerance and sensitization. Humana Press, Clifton, New Jersey, pp 181–219Google Scholar
  2. De Wit H, Stewart J (1981) Reinstatement of cocaine-reinforced responding in the rat. Psychopharmacology 75:134Google Scholar
  3. Dworkin SI, Porrino LJ, Smith JE (1992) Importance of behavioral controls in the analysis of on-going events. In: Brown R, Frascella J (eds) Neurobiological approaches to brain behavior interaction. NIDA Research Monograph. Alcohol Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration, Washington, DC (in press)Google Scholar
  4. Griffiths RR, Lukas SE, Bradford LD, Brady JV, Snell JD (1981) Self-injection of barbiturates and benzodiazepines in baboons. Psychopharmacology 75:101–109Google Scholar
  5. Griffiths RR, Sannerud CA, Ator NA, Brady JV (1992) Zolpidem behavioral pharmacology in baboons: self-injection, discrimination, tolerance and withdrawal. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 260:1199–1208Google Scholar
  6. Heizmann P, Eckert M, Zeigler WH (1983) Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of midazolam in man. Br J Clin Pharmacol 16:43S-49SGoogle Scholar
  7. Sannerud CA, Cook JM, Griffiths RR (1989) Behavioral differentiation of benzodiazepine ligands after repeated administration in baboons. Eur J Pharmacol 167:333–343Google Scholar
  8. Spealman RD (1985a) Discriminative-stimulus effects of midazolam in squirrel monkeys: comparison with other drugs and antagonism by Ro 15-1788. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 235:456–462Google Scholar
  9. Spealman RD (1985b) Environmental factors determining the control of behavior by drugs. In: Seiden LS, Balster RL (eds) Behavioral pharmacology: the current status. Liss, New York, pp 23–38Google Scholar
  10. Steiner SS, Beer B, Shaffer MM (1969) Escape from self-produced rates of brain stimulation. Science 163:91Google Scholar
  11. Young AM, Sannerud CA (1989) Tolerance to drug discriminative stimuli. In: Goudie AJ, Emmett-Oglesby MW (eds) Psychoactive drugs: tolerance and sensitization. Humana Press, Clifton, New Jersey, pp 221–278Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy A. Ator
    • 1
  • Roland R. Griffiths
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesJohns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Hopkins Bayview Research CampusBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of NeuroscienceJohns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Hopkins Bayview Research CampusBaltimoreUSA

Personalised recommendations