Psychopharmacology

, Volume 102, Issue 1, pp 73–75 | Cite as

Serotonin 5-HT2 receptor binding on blood platelets as a state dependent marker in major affective disorder

  • Anat Biegon
  • Nir Essar
  • Malka Israeli
  • Avner Elizur
  • Shlomo Bruch
  • Aliezer A. Bar-Nathan
Original Investigations

Abstract

Serotonin receptors of the 5-HT2 type were studied on platelet membranes from 15 patients suffering from major depression. Receptor binding and clinical state (assessed by the Hamilton and Beck rating scales) were examined in a drug free state upon admission and after 1 and 3 weeks of treatment with the antidepressant maprotiline (MPT). 5-HT2 receptor binding changed in correlation with changes in the clinical state of the patients as judged by the rating scales. Since most patients showed a clinical improvement, the patients as a group exhibited a significant decrease in binding concomitant with a drop in depression scores. However, in those patients in whom there was no clinical change or an increase in depression scores, 5-HT2 receptor binding did not change or increased, respectively, thus resulting in a significant correlation between clinical changes and changes in binding. These results support the use of 5-HT2 receptors on platelets in evaluating depression and its treatment.

Key words

Serotonin Platelets Depression 5-HT2 receptors Maprotiline 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anat Biegon
    • 1
  • Nir Essar
    • 2
  • Malka Israeli
    • 1
  • Avner Elizur
    • 2
  • Shlomo Bruch
    • 2
  • Aliezer A. Bar-Nathan
    • 3
  1. 1.Weizman Institute of ScienceRehovotIsrael
  2. 2.Abarbenael Mental Health CenterBat-YamIsrael
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryTel Aviv Medical CenterTel AvivIsrael

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