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Psychopharmacology

, Volume 113, Issue 2, pp 199–204 | Cite as

Determination of plasma and brain concentrations of SCH 39166 and their correlation to conditioned avoidance behavior in rats

  • Clark E. Tedford
  • Vicki L. Coffin
  • Vilma Ruperto
  • Mary Cohen
  • Robert D. McQuade
  • Richard Johnson
  • Hong-Ki Kim
  • Chin-Chung Lin
Original Investigations

Abstract

Plasma and brain concentrations of the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, SCH 39166, were measured and compared to behavioral activity in the conditioned avoidance response paradigm (CAR). SCH 39166 was administered at two behaviorally active doses (1 mg/kg, SC and 10 mg/kg, PO) and the time course for CAR activity was compared with the plasma and brain concentrations of unconjugated SCH 39166. Conjugation andN-demethylation of SCH 39166 after oral administration were also determined and first pass metabolism examined. Results from these studies demonstrated a similar time-dependent disappearance of unconjugated SCH 39166 from both the plasma and brain, independent of route of administration. Brain concentrations of SCH 39166 were approximately 5-fold higher than corresponding plasma concentrations, regardless of route. However, plasma and brain concentrations of unconjugated SCH 39166 were higher after SC administration of 1.0 mg/kg, than after PO administration of 10 mg/kg, suggesting a substantial first pass metabolism of SCH 39166. In addition, total (conjugated and unconjugated) plasma concentrations of SCH 39166 were at least 10-fold higher than unconjugated concentrations of SCH 39166 after PO administration of 10 mg/kg, demonstrating that a high proportion of drug was conjugated. Metabolism to theN-desmethyl analog, SCH 40853, was observed after PO administration of 10 mg/kg SCH 39166 and a high proportion of conjugation of the desmethyl analog was also seen. Finally, plasma concentrations of unconjugated SCH 39166 exhibited a high positive correlation (r=0.934,P<0.001) with brain concentrations of unconjugated SCH 39166. Behavioral activity in the CAR was also positively correlated with plasma concentrations (r=0.95,P<0.001) and brain concentrations (r=0.88,P<0.001) of unconjugated SCH 39166.

Key words

D1 dopamine receptor SCH 39166 Dopamine antagonist Plasma concentrations Brain concentrations 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clark E. Tedford
    • 1
  • Vicki L. Coffin
    • 1
  • Vilma Ruperto
    • 1
  • Mary Cohen
    • 1
  • Robert D. McQuade
    • 1
  • Richard Johnson
    • 2
  • Hong-Ki Kim
    • 1
  • Chin-Chung Lin
    • 1
  1. 1.Schering-Plough Research Institute KenilworthUSA
  2. 2.Wisconsin Analytical and Research Services, LTD.MadisonUSA

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