Psychopharmacology

, Volume 108, Issue 3, pp 380–386 | Cite as

Effect of the 5-HT1A partial agonist buspirone on regional cerebral blood flow in man

  • P. M. Grasby
  • K. J. Friston
  • C. Bench
  • P. J. Cowen
  • C. D. Frith
  • P. F. Liddle
  • R. S. J. Frackowiak
  • R. J. Dolan
Original Investigations

Abstract

Repeated measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were made in normal volunteers before, and after, the administration of the 5-HT1A partial agonist, buspirone, or placebo. The difference in rCBF, before and after drug, (buspirone versus placebo) was used to identify brain areas affected by buspirone. Buspirone-induced changes in rCBF were studied under two behavioural conditions (5 word-list learning and 15 word-list learning). Compared to placebo, buspirone increased blood flow in the cuneus during both behavioural states. However, decreases in blood flow, centred in the left dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex, were only observed under one of the two behavioural conditions. It is concluded that buspirone-induced alterations in regional cerebral blood flow are better understood, not in relation to the known distribution of monoamine neurotransmitter systems (particularly ascending 5-HT projections), but rather in relation to putative neuronal circuits possibly many synapses “downstream” of buspirone's pharmacological site of action.

Key words

Buspirone 5-HT1A receptors Positron emission tomography Statistical parametric mapping Pharmacological challenge 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. M. Grasby
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. J. Friston
    • 1
  • C. Bench
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. J. Cowen
    • 4
  • C. D. Frith
    • 1
  • P. F. Liddle
    • 1
  • R. S. J. Frackowiak
    • 1
    • 3
  • R. J. Dolan
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.MRC Cyclotron UnitHammersmith HospitalLondonUK
  2. 2.Academic Department of PsychiatryRoyal Free Hospital and School of MedicineLondonUK
  3. 3.National Hospial for Neurology and NeurosurgeryLondonUK
  4. 4.MRC Clinical Pharmacology UnitLittlemore Hospital, LittlemoreOxfordUK

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