Psychopharmacology

, Volume 112, Issue 2–3, pp 183–188 | Cite as

Differences in morphine reinforcement property in two inbred rat strains: associations with cortical receptors, behavioral activity, analgesia and the cataleptic effects of morphine

  • Sergey K. Sudakov
  • Steven R. Goldberg
  • Elena V. Borisova
  • Lidia A. Surkova
  • Irina V. Turina
  • Dimitrij Ju. Rusakov
  • Gregory I. Elmer
Original Investigations

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to investigate genetic differences between two inbred strains of rats, Fisher-344 (F344/N) and Wistar Albino Glaxo (WAG/GSto), in a number of drug-naive and drug-related behaviors, including oral and intravenous morphine self-administration. F344/N and WAG/GSto rats differed in drug-naive behaviors such as nociception, rearing and sensitivity to lick suppression tests but did not differ in locomotor activity, ambulation or grooming behavior. F344/N rats were less sensitive to thermal stimuli as measured via tail-flick response, and more sensitive to the suppressive effects of intermittent shock in a lick suppression test. The F344/N rats demonstrated a significantly greater amount of rearing in open field tests but did not differ from WAG/GSto rats in locomotor activity, ambulation or grooming behavior. In addition to the behavioral results, naive F344/N and WAG/GSto rats were found to differ in μ and α2 receptor concentrations (F344/N>WAG/GSto) and in 5HT2 and D2 affinity constants (WAG/GSto>F344/N). These two inbred rat strains also differed in drug-related behaviors. F344/N rats showed significantly greater depression of locomotor activity at morphine 3 mg/kg than WAG/GSto rats. In addition, F344/N rats consumed significantly greater amounts of morphine in a two-bottle choice procedure and morphine maintained significantly greater amounts of behavior during intravenous self-administration sessions. Importantly, drug maintained behavior was significantly greater than with vehicle only in the F344/N rats during operant self-administration sessions.

Key words

Morphine Behavioral activity Analgesia Rat Self-administration Genetics 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sergey K. Sudakov
    • 1
  • Steven R. Goldberg
    • 2
  • Elena V. Borisova
    • 1
  • Lidia A. Surkova
    • 1
  • Irina V. Turina
    • 1
  • Dimitrij Ju. Rusakov
    • 1
  • Gregory I. Elmer
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Experimental Therapy of Drug Abuse, Institute of Medico-Biological Problems of AddictionAll-Union Research Center of AddictionsMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Behavioral Pharmacology and Genetics Section, Preclinical Pharmacology Laboratory, National Institute on Drug AbuseAddiction Research CenterBaltimoreUSA

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