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Effects of smoking on simple and choice reaction time

Abstract

Twenty-nine subjects performed a reaction time task with four levels of choice-task complexity under non-smoking, sham smoking, and low, medium and high nicotine cigarette conditions. Nicotine reduced decision time, while sham smoking increased decision time. This effect was independent of subjects' habitual levels of cigarette consumption. No effect of smoking was found on movement time.

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Bates, T., Pellett, O., Stough, C. et al. Effects of smoking on simple and choice reaction time. Psychopharmacology 114, 365–368 (1994). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02244860

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02244860

Key words

  • Intelligence
  • Decision time
  • Nicotine, smoking