Psychopharmacology

, Volume 110, Issue 4, pp 421–426 | Cite as

Effects of acute doses of oxiracetam in the scopolamine model of human amnesia

  • Laura Preda
  • Margherita Alberoni
  • Sergio Bressi
  • Carlo Cattaneo
  • Jacopo Parini
  • Nicola Canal
  • Massimo Franceschi
Original Investigations

Abstract

The scopolamine model of amnesia has been used to test the pharmacodynamic efficacy of oxiracetam in 12 healthy volunteers. The subjects were divided into four experimental groups, according to a double-blind cross over incomplete randomized block design. After a baseline neuropsychological examination, each subject received in two separate sessions one of the following treatments, as acute oral doses: oxiracetam 800, 1600, 2400 mg or placebo. One hour after treatment scopolamine hydrobromide (0.5 mg) was given subcutaneously. The cognitive performance was tested before and 1, 2, 3 and 25 h after scopolamine administration. Scopolamine caused a deterioration of performance of verbal episodic memory, semantic memory and attention tests. In comparison to placebo, oxiracetam improved the overall test performance, with a statistically significant difference at the dose of 1600 mg on delayed recall of word lists, and showed dose-related antagonism of scopolamine-induced effects also on semantic memory and attention. The efficacy of an acute dose of oxiracetam in reducing scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment supports the potential usefulness of this pharmacological model of amnesia for studying the effects of cognition enhancers in humans.

Key words

Oxiracetam Scopolamine Nootropic drugs Memory and learning 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura Preda
    • 1
  • Margherita Alberoni
    • 1
  • Sergio Bressi
    • 1
  • Carlo Cattaneo
    • 2
  • Jacopo Parini
    • 2
  • Nicola Canal
    • 1
  • Massimo Franceschi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, Dementia Research UnitUniversity of Milan, Scientific Institute, San Raffaele HospitalMilanItaly
  2. 2.ISF, Laboratories for Biomedical ResearchTrezzano sul NaviglioMilanItaly

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