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Psychopharmacology

, Volume 100, Issue 2, pp 237–242 | Cite as

Changes in seizure threshold and aggression during chronic treatment with three anticonvulsants and on drug withdrawal

  • Sandra E. File
  • Lucy J. Wilks
Original Investigations

Abstract

Sodium phenobarbitone (20 and 70 mg/kg) had a significant anticonvulsant action against pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures, which persisted for 21 days of treatment. On drug withdrawal there was a significant decrease in seizure threshold below control level 24–48 h after the last dose of 70 mg/kg. Phenytoin (40 mg/kg) had a significant anticonvulsant action after 7 days of treatment and this persisted for 21 days of treatment. On drug withdrawal there was a significant decrease in seizure threshold 48 h after the last dose. Lorazepam (0.1 mg/kg) had a significant anticonvulsant action, but the group tested after 21 days of treatment did not differ from the controls, indicating that tolerance had developed to this effect; on drug withdrawal there was a decrease in seizure threshold from 24 to 72 h. The only drug to increase aggressive behaviour was sodium phenobarbitone (70 mg/kg); this reached significance after 14 and 21 days of treatment and occurred 8 h after drug administration; 0.5 h after drug administration phenobarbitone (70 mg/kg) abolished aggressive behaviour. After 7 days of treatment phenobarbitone (70 mg/kg) increased social behaviour 0.5 h after administration and this was still increased after 21 days of treatment. On drug withdrawal, there were no changes in aggressive behaviour, but there were significant decreases in social behaviour 24 and 48 h after phenobarbitone (70 mg/kg) withdrawal and 24, 48 and 72 h after lorazepam (0.1 mg/kg) withdrawal.

Key words

Barbiturate Diphenylhydantoin Benzodiazepine Anticonvulsant Aggression Social behaviour Tolerance Withdrawal 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra E. File
    • 1
  • Lucy J. Wilks
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychopharmacology Research Unit, UMDS Division of PharmacologyUniversity of London, Guy's HospitalLondonUK

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