Criminality of place

Crime generators and crime attractors
  • Patricia Brantingham
  • Paul Brantingham
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Copyright information

© Kugler Publications 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Brantingham
    • 1
  • Paul Brantingham
    • 1
  1. 1.School of CriminologySimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada

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