Geo-Marine Letters

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 219–228 | Cite as

Tertiary foraminiferal rock samples from the western Solomon Sea

  • David W. Haig
Article

Abstract

Rock fragments dredged from four R/VNatsushima stations contain Tertiary foraminifera. The oldest sample is an upper bathyal biomicrite of Early Eocene age (52 to 53.5 Ma) from the the Trobriand Platform. Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene neritic limestones were located off the Trobriand Platform and on the inner wall of the New Britain Trench. Miocene bathyal sediments come from the Trobriand Platform; similar Pliocene rocks were recovered here as well as from the inner wall of the New Britain Trench and the central part of the Solomon Sea Basin. No reworked pre-Tertiary foraminifera are present in any sample.

Keywords

Eocene Foraminifera Middle Miocene Australian Bureau Middle Eocene 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Honza E, Keene .1B, Shipboard Scientists (1984) Cruise report, R/VNatsushima, December 4. 1983–January 5, 1984, geological and geophysical investigation of the western Solomon Sea and adjacent areas. Report Geological Survey of Papua New Guinea 84/11Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Crook KAW (1987) Petrology and mineral chemistry of sedimentary rocks from the western Solomon Sea. Geo-Marine Letters 6:203–209CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ingle JC Jr (1980) Cenozoic paleobathymetry and depositional history of selected sequences within the southern California continental borderland. Cushman Foundation for Foraminiferal Research Special Publication 19:163–195Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Berggren WA (1969) Cenozoic chronostratigraphy. planktonic foraminiferal zonation and the radiometric time scale. Nature 224:1072–1075CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Blow WH (1979) The Cainozoic Globigerinida. Brill, LeidenGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Berggren WA (1977) Atlas of Palaeogene planktonic forarninifera—some species of the generaSubbotina, Planorotalites, Morozovella, Acarinino andTruncorotaloides. In: Ramsay ATS (ed) Oceanic Micropalaeontology. Academic Press, London, pp 205–299Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Berggren WA (1981) Review. Micropaleontology 27:99–108CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Berggren WA (1969) Rates of evolution in some Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera. Micropaleontology 15:351–365CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Hardenbol J, Berggren WA (1978) A new Paleogene numerical time scale. In: Cohee GV, Glaessner MF, Hedberg HD (eds) Contributions to the geological time scale. American Association of Petroleum Geologists Studies in Geology 6, pp 213–234Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Lowrie W, Alvarez W (1981) One hundred million years of geomagnetic polarity history. Geology 9:392–397CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Weissel JK, Watts AB (1979) Tectonic evolution of the Coral Sea Basin. Journal Geophysical Research 84:4572–4582CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Davies HL, Symonds PA, Ripper ID (1984) Structure and evolution of the southern Solomon Sea region. Bureau of Mineral Resources Journal of Australian Geology and Geophysics 9:49–68Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Belford DJ (1967) Paleocene planktonic foraminifera from Papua and New Guinea. Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics Bulletin 92:1–33Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Francis G (1985) Stratigraphy of the Cape Vogel Basin. Geological Survey of Papua New Guinea Report 85/4Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Haig DW (1982) Deep-sea foraminiferids from Paleocene sediments, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. Journal of Foraminiferal Research 12:287–297CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Rogerson R, Haig DW, Nion STS (1981) Geology of Port Moresby. Geological Survey of Papua New Guinea 81/16Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Coleman PJ (1963) Tertiary larger foraminifera of the British Solomon Islands, southwest Pacific. Micropaleontology 9:1–38CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Adams CG (1984) Neogene larger foraminifera, evolutionary and geological events in the context of datum planes. In: Ikebe N, Tsuchi R (eds) Pacific Neogene Datum Planes, contributions of biostratigraphy and chronology. University of Tokyo Press, pp 47–67Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Blow WH (1969) Late middle Eocene to Recent planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy. In: Bronnimann P, Renz HH (eds) Proceedings of the First International Conference on Planktonic Microfossils, Geneva, 1967. Brill, Leiden1, pp 199–422Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Kennett JP, Srinivasan MS (1983) Neogene planktonic foraminifera—a phylogenetic atlas. Hutchinson & Ross, Stroudsburg, PAGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Belford DJ (1981) Co-occurrence of middle Miocene larger and planktic smaller foraminifera, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea. Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics. Bulletin 209:1–21Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Ryburn KJ (1974) Pomio. New Britain. Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics, Explanatory Notes 1:250000 Geological Series SB/56-6Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Berggren WA, Burckle LH, Cita MB, Cooke HBS. Funnell BM, Gartner S, Hays JD, Kennett JP, Opdyke ND, Pastouret L, Shackleton NJ, Takayanagi Y (1980) Towards a Quaternary time scale. Quaternary Research 13:277–302CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Saito T (1976) Geologic significance of coiling direction in the planktonic foraminiferaPulleniatina. Geology 4:305–309CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Thompson PR, Be AWH, Duplessy JC, Shackleton NJ (1979) Disappearance of pink-pigmentedGlobigerinoides ruber at 120, 000 yr BP in the Indian and Pacific oceans. Nature 280:554–558CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Thompson PR, Sciarrillo JR (1978) Planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy in the equatorial Pacific. Nature 276:29–33CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Belford DJ (1976) Foraminifera and age of samples from southeastern Papua. Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics, Bulletin 165:73–86Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Haig DW, Malagun S (1980) Uppermost Cretaceous and lowermost Tertiary sediments around Bogoro Inlet, near Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. Science in New Guinea 7:12–21Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Brown CM (1977) Yule Papua New Guinea. Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources Geology and Geophysics Explanatory Notes 1:250000 Geological Series SC/55-2Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Robinson GP, Jaques AL, Brown CM (1976) Madang Papua New Guinea. Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics Explanatory Notes 1:250000 Geological Series SB/55-6Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Davies HL (1983) Wabag Papua New Guinea. Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics Explanatory Notes 1:250000 Geological Series SB/54-8Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Belford DJ (1984) Tertiary foraminifera and age of sediments, Ok Tedi-Wabag, Papua New Guinea. Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics, Bulletin 216:152Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Brown CM, Robinson GP (1982) Kutubu Papua New Guinea. Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics Explanatory Notes 1:250000 Geological Series SB/ 54-12Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Chaproniere GCH (1980) Biometrical studies of early Neogene larger Foraminiferida from Australia and New Zealand. Alcheringa 4:153–181CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    Chaproniere GCH (1981) Australasian mid-Tertiary larger foraminiferal associations and their bearing on the East Indian Letter Classification. Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources, Journal of Australian Geology and Geophysics 6:145–151Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • David W. Haig
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeologyUniversity of Western AustraliaNedlandsWestern Australia

Personalised recommendations