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Geo-Marine Letters

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 55–57 | Cite as

Barnacle plate sediment production by sheepshead, the Indian River, Florida

  • C. M. Hoskin
  • J. K. Reed
Article

Abstract

Living barnacles eaten by sheepshead fishes results in the production of broken barnacle plate sediment. The yearly rate of production of broken barnacle plates is 4.9 kg m−2 and varies seasonally, with the largest mean flux in summer (22.5 g m−2 day−1) and the least in winter (1.9 g m−2 day−1). The mean grain size mode of broken barnacle plates is positively correlated with the flux of broken barnacle plates. Experiments with exclusion and inclusion cages support the postulation that increases in flux and size of broken barnacle plates are caused by the feeding activity of larger sheepshead.

Keywords

Grain Size Yearly Rate Feeding Activity Size Mode Sediment Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. M. Hoskin
    • 1
  • J. K. Reed
    • 1
  1. 1.Marine Geology DepartmentHarbor Branch Foundation, Inc.Fort PierceUSA

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