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Geo-Marine Letters

, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 77–81 | Cite as

Mid-pacific mountains revisited

  • Loren W. Kroenke
  • James N. Kellogg
  • Kenji Nemoto
Article

Abstract

The Mid-Pacific Mountains are guyots whose volcanic pedestals have been constructed on a broad basement plateau, the flanks of which are downfaulted. Edifice construction may have been controlled by an orthogonal system of intersecting faults trending roughly ENE and NNW. Low amplitude gravity anomalies observed over the Mid-Pacific Mountains indicate complete Airy-Heiskanen isostatic compensation, crustal thickening, and eruption on thin elastic lithosphere. Tholeiites of the Mid-Pacific Mountains resemble lavas of Iceland and the Galapagos Islands. The orthogonal fault system, low gravity anomalies, and lava chemistry of the Mid-Pacific Mountains can be explained by eruption on or near a great ENE-trending rift system.

Keywords

Lithosphere Fault System Gravity Anomaly Crustal Thickening Edifice Construction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Loren W. Kroenke
    • 1
  • James N. Kellogg
    • 1
  • Kenji Nemoto
    • 1
  1. 1.Hawaii Institute of GeophysicsUniversity of HawaiiHonolulu

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