The American Journal of Digestive Diseases

, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 139–148 | Cite as

Effect of satiety center damage on food intake, blood glucose and gastric secretion in dogs

  • Yukio Nagamachi
Article

Abstract

Goldthioglucose is capable of damaging the ventromedial hypothalamus (satiety center) and inducing obesity in dogs, similar to the effects reported in mice and rats. Body weight was increased at a rate of 10% or more in 51% of the goldthioglucose-treated dogs during an 8-week period. Daily food intake was also increased, significantly, as high as 20% or more, in 68% of the goldthioglucose-treated dogs. Fasting blood-glucose levels did not show any change in obese animals, but blood glucose utilization increased significantly as compared with control animals. The sensitivity of glucose regulating mechanisms to insulin was enhanced by goldthioglucose treatment. Fasting gastric secretion in Pavlov pouch dogs, increased in volume and acidity, above preinjection levels of goldthioglucose, but this effect was not seen in Heidenhain pouch dogs.

Keywords

Obesity Blood Glucose Food Intake Glucose Utilization Gastric Secretion 

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Copyright information

© Harper & Row, Publishers, Incorporated 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yukio Nagamachi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgery IGunma University School of MedicineMaebashiJapan

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