Enzymatic assay and glucose and amino-acid uptake of intestinal biopsy specimens

  • Richard P. Spencer
  • Ted M. Bow
  • Mary Anne Markulis
  • Kenneth R. Brody
Article

Summary

1. An approach to the evaluation of human intestinal function is presented, based on the use of tissue segments obtained by peroral biopsy or surgical removal. Such segments possess the ability to take up radioactive amino acids and glucose in vitro. Homogenates of human intestinal tissue were utilized to estimate enzyme activities, thus allowing a “biochemical biopsy.” Correlation of the histologic appearance of intestinal tissue with its accumulative ability and enzyme content may provide an index of gut function.

2. Comparison of the mesenteric and antimesenteric halves of the hamster small intestine did not reveal statistically significant differences in amino-acid uptake, glucose uptake, or lactic-dehydrogenase activity. Hence although intestinal activities may vary with length, there is no clear evidence that they depend upon radial direction.

Keywords

Enzyme Glucose Uptake Radial Direction Intestinal Tissue Histologic Appearance 

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Copyright information

© Hoeber Medical Division of Harper & Row 1963

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard P. Spencer
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ted M. Bow
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mary Anne Markulis
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kenneth R. Brody
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.From the Department of BiophysicsState University of New York at BuffaloUSA
  2. 2.Radioisotope ServiceVeterans Administration HospitalBuffalo

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