Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 2, Issue 4, pp 329–360 | Cite as

Current archaeological research in the Middle Atlantic region of the eastern united states

  • Jay F. Custer
Article

Abstract

A major theme of current archaeological research in the Middle Atlantic region of Eastern North America is the recognition of cultural variability across space and through time. The most significant culture change experienced during the entire time frame of regional prehistory occurred ca. 5000 B.P., when there were major changes in regional environments. Before 5000 B.P., adaptations were characterized by small groups of mobile hunters and gatherers. After 5000 B.P., there were continued growth in regional populations and increases in sedentism, intensive use of a limited range of food resources, social group size, and social complexity.

Key words

Middle Atlantic archaeology cultural ecology culture history regional variability 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jay F. Custer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of DelawareNewark

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