The American Journal of Digestive Diseases

, Volume 6, Issue 10, pp 983–1001 | Cite as

Fluorocinematography

  • E. Clinton TexterJr.
Current Gastroenterology

Keywords

Public Health 

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Copyright information

© Paul B. Hoeber, Inc. 1961

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Clinton TexterJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.From the Department of MedicineNorthwestern University Medical SchoolChicago

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