The intensification of production: Archaeological approaches

  • Kathleen D. Morrison
Article

Abstract

In this paper I reexamine the Boserup model of agricultural intensification and archaeological reaction to it. Although causes have been extensively debated, little attention has been paid to process, and even those who reject the causal efficacy of population may adopt other aspects of the Boserup model. These “unexamined aspects” include the assumption that intensification proceeds along a single course, characterized by gradual decreases in the frequency of cropping. I suggest that the course of intensification is complex and variable and that, only by breaking down the process of intensification into its component strategies, can we come to an understanding of both the causes and the courses of intensification.

Key words

intensification economic change agriculture production 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen D. Morrison
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of Hawai'iHonolulu

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