Fluid Dynamics

, Volume 31, Issue 1, pp 121–126 | Cite as

Amplification of intense blast pressure in a medium with this rarefied channels

  • V. I. Artem'ev
  • V. I. Bergel'son
  • S. A. Medvedyuk
  • I. V. Nemchinov
  • T. I. Orlova
  • V. A. Rybakov
  • V. M. Khazins
Article

Abstract

It is known that a precursor is formed ahead of the wave front when a shock wave interacts with a hot thin surface layer. In this case for weak and moderate shock waves the maximum pressure at the measurement points on the surface is less than for shock waves propagating in the unperturbed medium. Below, it is shown, using estimates and numerical and laboratory simulation that precisely the opposite effect takes place in the near zone of an intense blast during the strong shock wave stage, i. e., the pressure at the measurement point may increase many times.

Keywords

Shock Wave Surface Layer Fluid Dynamics Opposite Effect Measurement Point 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. I. Artem'ev
  • V. I. Bergel'son
  • S. A. Medvedyuk
  • I. V. Nemchinov
  • T. I. Orlova
  • V. A. Rybakov
  • V. M. Khazins

There are no affiliations available

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